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ERIC Number: ED352582
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1992-Jan-30
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Aspirations of High School Seniors in Relation to Health Professions Career Objectives: A Career Development Counseling Perspective.
Thomson, William A.; And Others
One important aspect of contemporary career counseling involves the potential for career counselors to help redress the serious and avoidable underrepresentation of minorities within the health professions. This study explored career-related perceptions of the minority seniors at two high schools for the health professions located in two disparate areas of Texas. Nonminority seniors (N=202) from an urban high school and from a magnet high school in the "valley" of Texas with a disproportionately higher Hispanic population were included in the study. The study instrument asked about current career goals; career choice changes; influences on career decisions; educational goals; career choice satisfaction; and perceived obstacles to career objectives. The failure to isolate noteworthy differences involving the school sites suggests that the two schools function somewhat similarly as regards recruitment of students and the impacts of curricula. The failure to find gender differences is encouraging, as the result suggests that equity goals have been realized to at least some degree. African-Americans, relative to Hispanics and especially to Asians, were most motivated by financial rewards. The African-American students' feelings of less confidence about being able to obtain career objectives may be realistic, especially as regards health careers. A substantial number (39%) change their career goals while they are enrolled. Students change objectives because of perceived economic benefits, academic demands, or other influences. (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A