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ERIC Number: ED352518
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Dec
Pages: 40
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Learning Environment: An Architectural Interpretation of a New Designs Archetype High School.
Jilk, Bruce A.; And Others
The New Designs for the Comprehensive High School project used the break-the-mold design-down process to develop a prototype high school. The basic building block of this design is the personal workstation, not the classroom. Combining the personal workstation with the desire for teaming leads to the idea of a small, flexible group space that accommodates several personal workstations. High school students are grouped into approximately 100 pupils and gathered around a resource/production space to facilitate project-focused tasks. Neighborhoods that are virtually stand-alone schools are created. Along with the multiple-use commons, they give students a meaningful environment with a special identity. The flexible studio frees the school organization from the limitations of the physical environment and allows for the complete integration of vocational and academic subject matter. Support staff are located in as friendly and accessible a manner as possible. Learning technology permits information to be everywhere. Instructional material centers, computer rooms, and the problems of scheduling access to them no longer exist. Many places in the design provide for demonstration and display, now an important part of assessment. This design connects students to their surroundings and provides space for the community in the school. (Three tables show hierarchical organization and space requirements. Eleven figures depict relationship diagrams and graphic representations of the new designs.) (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Center for Research in Vocational Education, Berkeley, CA.
Note: In "New Designs for the Comprehensive High School. Volume II--Working Papers"; see CE 062 664.