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ERIC Number: ED346873
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1992-Apr-14
Pages: 99
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Use of Children's Materials in School and Public Libraries.
Garland, Kathleen
The first phase of this study was a nationwide survey that examined children's services statistics collected by state agencies and the collection of juvenile circulation statistics by individual public librarians. The study investigated the extent to which these statistics were collected by the two groups and were available through state agencies. Few children's services statistics of any kind were collected by state agencies. Ten agencies requested no public library youth-related information on their report forms. Circulation statistics of juvenile materials appear to be widely available at the local level, however, as 89.1% of the public librarians reported collecting them. In the second phase of this study the 50 state education agencies were asked about school library media center statistics they regularly collect. In addition, a random sample of individual elementary and middle school library media specialists nationwide were asked about the kinds of circulation statistics they collect. Although approximately 53% of the school respondents reported collecting circulation data, almost half of the state agencies (24) were not regularly collecting any library media program statistics. The goal of the third phase of this study was to investigate similarities and differences in the use of children's collections in two paired sets of school and public libraries in the same communities. A rural and a suburban community were studied to determine whether there were differences in the types and subjects of children's books that circulated. The public libraries circulated significantly more easy fiction, and the elementary school library media centers circulated significantly more fiction and nonfiction. The most highly circulated juvenile nonfiction books were in the 300, 500, 600, and 900 Dewey classes. Circulation of juvenile nonfiction within each of these classes was subject to local variation, however. (Three appendices contain copies of the survey forms and directories of statistics collected by state agencies on children's library programs and services and on school library media programs.) (Author)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Department of Education, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor. School of Information and Library Studies.