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ERIC Number: ED343088
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Dec
Pages: 7
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Portfolio Assessment in Teacher Education Courses: Impact on Students' Beliefs, Attitudes and Habits.
Ford, Michael P.; Ohlhausen, Marilyn M.
A study surveyed teacher education students' attitudes, beliefs, and habits concerning portfolio assessment. Subjects were 230 students in 10 different graduate courses on literacy education at two colleges: the University of Wisconsin and the University of Nevada. One hundred fifteen subjects (a 50% response) responded to a questionnaire. Results indicated that: (1) although 90% of the subjects had little or no knowledge of portfolio assessment prior to the course, 86% rated their knowledge of portfolio assessment as moderate to high at the end of the course; (2) 91% stated their beliefs about assessment had changed over the years, and that participation in a course which involved portfolio assessment played a critical role in such change; (3) 75% were not using any form of portfolio assessment at the start of the course, while only 12% were not using portfolios after the course; and (4) although only 46% reported that they continued to develop their literacy portfolios after the course, almost one-third of the teachers continued to pursue many of the personal goals they had set for themselves as readers and writers even though they were not updating their portfolios. Findings suggest that: graduate coursework has the potential of playing a critical role in positively influencing teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and classroom practices related to alternative forms of assessment; portfolios create the opportunity to involve learners in directing, documenting, and evaluating their own learning; and teacher educators have the potential to actually touch the lives of teachers as literate beings. (Six tables of data are attached.) (RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Reading Conference (41st, Palm Springs, CA, December 3-7, 1991).