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ERIC Number: ED325161
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Jun
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Inferred Program Costs: Occupational Programs, FY84-89. Research Brief RB90-12.
McCoy, Kay R.
The Inferred Program Cost (IPC), a program evaluation indicator in use at Prince George's Community College (PGCC), represents the cost of one student completing the curriculum requirements for a degree or certificate program/option as specified in the current college catalog. The IFP for each program is the dollar amount representing the theoretical cost of producing one graduate based on the costs of instruction in a given fiscal year. This report examines the IPC's of all occupational programs at PGCC from Fiscal Year (FY) 1984 through FY89. Among the findings presented are the following: (1) the median IPC for associate in arts (AA) programs in FY89 was $8,544, ranging from a low of $6,151 for Microcomputer Systems to a high of $18,042 for Respiratory Therapist; (2) the five allied health programs were the most costly AA options, while the three business/management programs were among the four least expensive; (3) the FY89 IPC's for certificate programs ranged from $2,029 for the Marketing Management certificate to $5,561 for the Medical Secretary certificate; and (4) Respiratory Therapist and Nuclear Medicine Technology programs showed the greatest IPC increase over the 5-year period (118% and 94%, respectively), while Criminal Justice Technology and Early Childhood Education showed the smallest IPC increases (11% and 13%, respectively). Detailed data tables are appended, presenting the IPC for all PGCC AA and certificate programs from FY 1984 through FY 1989. (JMC)
Publication Type: Numerical/Quantitative Data; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Administrators; Researchers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Prince George's Community Coll., Largo, MD. Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.