NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED324557
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Jun-20
Pages: 43
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Patterns of Competence and Adjustment among Adolescents from Authoritative, Authoritarian, Indulgent, and Neglectful Families.
Lamborn, Susie D.; And Others
To test Maccoby and Martin's (1983) revision of Baumrind's conceptual framework, the families of approximately 4,100 14- to 18-year-olds were classified into one of 4 groups (authoritative, authoritarian, indulgent, or neglectful) on the basis of the adolescents' ratings of their parents on 2 dimensions: acceptance/involvement and firm control. The youngsters were then contrasted along four sets of outcomes: psychosocial development, school achievement, internalized distress, and problem behavior. Results indicated that adolescents raised in authoritative homes scored highest on measures of psychosocial competence and lowest on measures of psychological and behavioral dysfunction; the reverse was true for adolescents raised in neglectful homes. Adolescents raised in authoritarian homes scored reasonably well on measures indexing obedience and conformity to the standards of adults but had relatively poorer self-conceptions than other youngsters. In contrast, adolescents from indulgent homes evidenced a strong sense of self-confidence, but reported a higher frequency of substance abuse and school misconduct and were less engaged in school. The findings suggest that Maccoby and Martin's four-fold classification scheme provides a workable empirical framework for those interested in the study of adolscent socialization. More important, the results illustrate the need to distinguish between two types of "permissive" families: those that are indulgent and those that are neglectful. (Author)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Spencer Foundation, Chicago, IL.; Office of Educational Research and Improvement (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: National Center on Effective Secondary Schools, Madison, WI.