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ERIC Number: ED324018
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Apr-6
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Learning To Live with Complexity.
Dosa, Marta
Neither the design of information systems and networks nor the delivery of library services can claim true user centricity without an understanding of the multifaceted psychological environment of users and potential users. The complexity of the political process, social problems, challenges to scientific inquiry, entrepreneurship, and technological competition is the underlying characteristic of the present information environment. Information professionals must learn to live with complexities in order to strengthen the positive forces in society, to create optimal situations exploiting knowledge on behalf of individuals and society, and to fight persistent problems with all available tools of knowledge. Research into information requirements and the interrelatedness of different cognitive processes is probably the most needed research for future policies and systems. Information scientists, librarians, information resources managers, archivists, records managers, information counselors, and other roles emerging in response to the complex information market must reach out to each other and bridge the divisive lines of professional roles to sustain professional values and ethical approaches to complex information issues. Such issues include the challenges presented by multicultural local communities, the globalized world economy, the need for unbiased facts for the nonscientific or nonlegal information user, rapid and powerful advances in information technology, and the need for information for interdisciplinary solving of social and economic problems. (SD)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Alumni Reunion of the School of Information and Library Studies, University of Michigan (Ann Arbor, MI, April 6, 1990).