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ERIC Number: ED322884
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989
Pages: 52
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Role of Public Policy in the New Television Marketplace.
Blumler, Jay G.
This paper, the first in a series exploring future options for public policy in the communications and information arenas, argues that there is a continuing role for public policy in the electronic media marketplace. It contends that the role of television in our society is too important for it to be regarded as just another business, and the goals for public policy for television stand in urgent need of a comprehensive restatement in terms suited to modern conditions. It is recommended that these goals include: (1) universality of provision (citizens must not be deprived of an essential service due to their location or inability to pay); (2) meaningful choice (communication overload demands that viewers think critically about the programming they choose); (3) plurality/diversity of programming; (4) full and fair access to communication systems; (5) nurturance of impulses of producer creativity, originality, and innovation (profits must not be allowed to press creative efforts into narrow molds); (6) independence of program makers from government and/or advertiser interference; (7) support for communication beyond financial gain; and (8) respect for the audience. A policy rationale is presented that flows from these goals and includes decisions to be taken about the role of the commercial networks cable, public television, and the Federal Communications Commission, as well as a strategy for redressing imbalances across different types of programming. A list of the titles in this series is included. (4 references) (DB)
Policy Options Project, Benton Foundation, 1776 K Street, NW, Washington, DC 20006 ($6.50 for individual paper, boxed set of 8 papers, $33.00).
Publication Type: Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Benton Foundation, Washington, DC.
Note: Project on Communications & Information Policy Options. For related papers, see IR 014 584-585.