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ERIC Number: ED322115
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Apr
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Teacher Pupil-Control Ideology and Behavior as Predictors of Classroom Environment: Public and Catholic Schools Compared. Draft.
Lunenburg, Fred C.
This study examined differences between public and Catholic schools concerning teachers' pupil control ideology, teachers' pupil control behavior, and students' perceptions of their classroom environments. The concepts of humanistic and custodial pupil control ideologies were used to contrast types of individual orientations and the types of school organizations that they seek to rationalize and justify. Custodial orientation depicts a classroom atmosphere with a rigid and highly controlled setting concerned primarily with the maintenance of order. Humanistic orientation conceives of the school and classroom as an educational community in which students learn through cooperative interaction and experience. The subjects of the study were secondary teachers and students in two public school districts and in the Catholic schools in a large city in the Midwest. Teachers in the Catholic schools were found to be more humanistic in pupil control ideology than teachers in public schools; however, no statistically significant differences were found in either pupil control behavior or students' perceptions of their teachers' control patterns. The finding that teacher humanism in pupil control ideology and behavior is associated with students' perceptions of classroom life as more interesting, challenging, and action-packed, supports earlier research; it shows that teachers do make a difference in what school is like for students. (JD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, April 17-20, 1990).