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ERIC Number: ED321304
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Nov
Pages: 32
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
"What She Doesn't Know Won't Hurt Her": Gender Effects on Patterns of Interpersonal Deception.
Justice, Paula Lippard
A study was conducted to determine if (1) significant gender differences exist in prevalence of deception, motivation for deception, and recipients of deception; and (2) whether such differences support traditional gender role perceptions and expectations. Seventy-four subjects, 50 female and 24 male undergraduate students, recorded all instances of interpersonal deception for a period of three weeks. A total of 940 instances of deception were coded and analyzed, 618 for women and 322 for men. The records revealed significant differences between the sexes in motivation for lying as well as significant gender differences as recipients of deception. A significant difference between sexes existed for primary motivation subcategories, although very weak. Differences appeared to lie primarily in: request acceptance, avoid hurt feelings, and third party protection. Significant differences were present in the crosstabulation of recipient gender and primary motivation categories in the following subcategories: avoid hurt feelings, avoid interaction, fidelity, and worry another. These differences were even stronger for male subjects alone in the subcategories of request refusal, obligation-excuse, and resource acquisition. For female subjects alone in this category, differences emerged in control of others, self-protection and obligation-excuse. Largely these differences reflected and reinforced gender role stereotypes indicating that deception strategies are part of gender socialization. (Five tables of data are included, and 16 references are attached.) (MG)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (73rd, Boston, MA, November 5-8, 1987).