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ERIC Number: ED320439
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Mar
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Implications for Intelligent Tutoring Systems for Research and Practice in Foreign Language Learning, NFLC Occasional Papers.
Ginsberg, Ralph B.
Most of the now commonplace computer-assisted instruction (CAI) uses computers to increase the capacity to perform logical, numerical, and symbolic computations. However, computers are an interactive and potentially intelligent medium. The implications of artificial intelligence (AI) for learning are more radical than those for traditional CAI. AI research and development promises to deepen understanding and reshape practice in and out of the classroom. This report, the first of three, gives an overview of the character and motivation of AI approaches to education and learning. The first section describes and gives the background for the report. The second section introduces AI programs designed to emulate good teaching (intelligent tutoring systems, or ITS), and computer-based"microworlds," designed to be effective learning environments. Both are compared with the more familiar CAI and simulation. In section three, the main components of ITS architecture are discussed, including domain expertise, student modeling and diagnosis, teaching strategies, planning and control, task structure, and the learner-computer interface. Section four is concerned with how learning has been conceptualized by AI researchers, and with the design principles that derive from that conceptualization. Finally, issues concerning research and industrial design are outlined. (MSE)
Cashier, National Foreign Language Center, 1619 Massachusetts Ave., N.W., Washington, DC 20036 ($3.00 including postage and handling; checks payable to NFLC).
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Evaluative; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Johns Hopkins Univ., Washington, DC. National Foreign Language Center.
Note: Revised version of a paper presented at a Conference on Empirical Research on Second Language Learning in Instructional Settings (Bellagio, Italy, June 20-24, 1988).