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ERIC Number: ED319456
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Diversity without Divisiveness: toward Agreement on Fundamental Values for a "One World Curriculum".
Glock, Nancy Clover
As humanity moves rapidly toward a "one world" society, a new paradigm for curriculum development more fundamental than particular cultural traditions must be found. Such a model may be derived from the requirements for the survival of the human species. The content of the resulting curriculum would be: (1) socially cohesive, providing common reference points to all members of society; (2) culturally inclusive, drawing upon diverse human cultures and recognizing the contributions of all social classes; (3) ethically selective, supporting values necessary to environmental and species survival and human fulfillment; (4) conceptually generative, providing skills and general principles which allow for the synthesis and critical assessment of information; and (5) personally significant, creating options for in-depth study of particular cultures, classes, and conditions. This curriculum would recognize a shared humanity, but also the human tendency toward xenophobia which must yield under modern conditions. Old myths of Western Civilization would be replaced with new "one world" myths, that perpetuate certain values (e.g., civil liberty, pluralism, religious tolerance); promote new values (e.g., nonmilitarism, globalism, and mixed economy); re-introduce others (e.g., cooperation, communalism, and respect for all ages and all labor); call some values into question (e.g., environmental exploitation, materialism, competition, and hierarchical management); and fully reject others (e.g., imposed ignorance, religious intolerance, and racism). Sources for this paradigm include the urgent need for worldwide solutions to common problems; new knowledge in human neurology, biology, and anthropology; and the dissolution of rigid ideologies that constrained social analysis and economic and political discourse. (WJT)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper prepared for presentation at the Biennial Conference for the International Network for Philosophy and Education (London, England, August 1990).