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ERIC Number: ED318859
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Sep
Pages: 8
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Integration of Academic and Vocational-Technical Education.
Voc Tech News, spec iss Sep 1989
An integrated system of academic and vocational-technical education is vital to the well-being of students and the nation. Approaches to integrated programs include requiring more academic coursework of vocational students; including academic skills in vocational courses; and integrating the entire high school. Key activities for successful integration are curriculum and professional development supported by funding; strong leadership; involvement of both academic and vocational teachers; and enough time for restructuring the curriculum. The Maryland Vocational-Technical Education Commission recommends establishing an integrated system so that, by 2000, the dropout rate should be reduced to less than 1 percent and every student should graduate with a marketable skill, be technologically literate, and have an individual learning plan. A conceptual model of such a program would include a college preparatory program for college-bound students, articulated two-plus-two programs for students planning technical careers, and career entry programs for those planning employment after high school graduation. Barriers to integration are lack of well-established models; demands on teacher time; lack of resources, support, and assessment instruments; and lack of cognitive research findings. The Chicago High School for Agricultural Sciences countered arguments of lack of time in the school day by shortening lunch and eliminating study hall. Higher expectations motivated and challenged their lower ability students to succeed, rather than increasing their dropout rate. Efforts to integrate vocational and academic curricula can lead to a new role and new respect for vocational education. (SK)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Serials; Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Maryland State Advisory Council on Vocational-Technical Education, Baltimore.