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ERIC Number: ED318312
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1989-Nov
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Student Athlete Right-To-Know Act. Report Together with Minority Views. One Hundred First Congress. First Session.
Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.
Senate Bill 580, the Student Athlete Right-to-Know Act, requires institutions of higher education receiving Federal financial assistance to provide certain information concerning graduation rates of student-athletes. The report from the Committee on Labor and Human Resources recommends (by a 15-1 vote) to the full Senate that the Bill be passed as amended. It presents the amendment in full and information on the history of the legislation, background and need for the legislation, major provisions of the Bill, votes in committee, cost estimate, the regulatory impact statement, a section-by-section analysis, and a minority view. Justification for the Bill is seen in the poor graduation rate for most student athletes and the small probability that a given student athlete will go on to a professional athletic career. The Bill will require institutions of higher education to report the following: the number of students at the institution, the number of students receiving athletically related student aid, the average 4-year graduation rate for all students, the average 4-year graduation rate for students receiving athletically related student aid and the number and percentage of students receiving athletically related student aid who earned a bachelor's degree or its equivalent within 10 years of entering the school. The minority opposing opinion views the Bill as inappropriate for the Department of Education and excessively burdensome on both the reporting institutions and the Department. (DB)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.