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ERIC Number: ED317883
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Nov
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Appropriate Technology for an Aging Society. Critical Debates in an Aging Society Report 1.
American Society on Aging, San Francisco, CA.
Despite a real sense of need, the development and application of technology for the elderly has progressed very slowly. This report explores reasons for this slow progress; examines how the process can be moved along; looks at what must be known about aging and the future to assure appropriate technological application; considers how to translate the need for technological innovations into suitable products and assistive devices for the elderly; identifies the most vital steps to be taken by business leaders, technologists, and gerontologists; and determines what technologies are particularly critical. In addition, the report provides specific suggestions for using technology to meet the aging population's needs. Individual sections focus on the slow progress in using technology to aid the elderly, the elder market, applying technology to older people's needs, demographics, the context for studying technology and aging in the future, what it means to grow old, and limitations in daily functioning and their effects. The report concludes that the successful use of technology in improving health care and enhancing the quality of life for older people will depend on simplicity, training, considering the whole person, enhancing maximum independence, aiding caregivers, caregiving at home, evaluation, and funding. The appendix provides a detailed examination of specific physical and other changes which may occur as part of the aging process. A selected bibliography is included. (NB)
Publication Type: Reports - General
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: American Society on Aging, San Francisco, CA.
Note: A report based on the Technology and Aging Conference (Washington, DC, November 17-18, 1987).