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ERIC Number: ED317450
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Nov
Pages: 92
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Charting a Course: Social Studies for the 21st Century. A Report of the Curriculum Task Force of the National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools.
American Historical Association, Washington, DC.; Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Princeton, NJ.; Organization of American Historians, Bloomington, IN.; National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools, Washington, DC.; National Council for the Social Studies, Washington, DC.
This report by the Curriculum Task Force represents its considered conclusion about general reform (K-12) of the social studies curriculum in the United States. It presents a balanced and comprehensive curriculum program adapted to the needs of present day society and suggests direction for the future. Part 1 discusses the recommended social studies curriculum for grades K-12. Part 2 discusses the research basis for curriculum choice. Part 3 contains essays prepared by representatives of the professional associations holding membership in the Social Science Association's Task Force for Pre-College Education. These essays provide a perspective from the following fields: (1) anthropology; (2) economics; (3) U.S. history; (4) world history; (5) political science; (6) psychology; and (7) sociology. The characteristics of a social studies curriculum for the 21st century as set forth in this report include the following: (1) It must instill a clear understanding of the roles of citizens in a democracy and provide opportunities for active, engaged participation in civic, cultural, and volunteer activities. (2) It must provide consistent and cumulative learning from kindergarten through grade 12. (3) History and geography should provide the matrix for social studies with concepts from political science, economics, and other social sciences integrated throughout the curriculum. (4) A global approach should be taken, for a curriculum that focuses on one or two major civilizations is neither adequate nor complete. (5) Integration of other subject matter with social studies should be encouraged. (6) Students must be made aware that they have the capacity to shape the future. (7) Teaching strategies should help students become both independent and cooperative learners who develop skills of problem solving, decision making, negotiation, and conflict resolution. (8) Learning materials must incorporate a rich mix of written matter, audiovisual materials, computer programs, and items of material culture. (JB)
National Council for the Social Studies, 3501 Newark St., N.W., Washington, DC 20016 ($7.00 plus $2.00 postage and handling).
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Collected Works - General
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers; Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: Rockefeller Foundation, New York, NY.; John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Chicago, IL.; Carnegie Corp. of New York, NY.
Authoring Institution: American Historical Association, Washington, DC.; Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, Princeton, NJ.; Organization of American Historians, Bloomington, IN.; National Commission on Social Studies in the Schools, Washington, DC.; National Council for the Social Studies, Washington, DC.
Note: Also funded by a grant from the National Geographic Society Education Foundation.