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ERIC Number: ED317187
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Sep
Pages: 76
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Feedback Effects in Computer-Based Skill Learning. Final Report.
Levine, John M.; Schneider, Walter
This paper reports several experiments that investigated how performance feedback in a computer-based training environment affected students' acquisition of cognitive skills requiring substantial practice. College students worked on category-search or electronic troubleshooting tasks. Problems were presented, responses were recorded, and performance feedback was given using microcomputers. The studies examined the impact of receiving information about (1) temporal trends in one's own performance (i.e., intrapersonal feedback alone), and (2) temporal trends in both one's own and others' performance (i.e., joint intrapersonal and interpersonal feedback). In regard to intrapersonal feedback alone, the effects on students' learning of different types of "absolute" performance information (e.g., weighted versus unweighted averages of reaction times on previous trials) were assessed. Results indicated that these manipulations had only weak effects. In regard to joint intrapersonal and interpersonal feedback, the effects on students' learning of different types of "relative" performance information (superiority versus inferiority as compared to others) were assessed. Here, evidence revealed that the type of feedback students received influenced how well they performed. It is suggested that the impact of intrapersonal and interpersonal feedback will be affected by the amount of practice time needed to achieve proficiency, and that feedback may have a larger effect with extended training periods representative of normal classroom instruction. Data are presented in both tabular and graphical form. (65 references) (Author/GL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Naval Research, Arlington, VA.
Authoring Institution: Pittsburgh Univ., PA. Learning Research and Development Center.