NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED314326
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1989-Sep-3
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Advancing the Women's Agenda within Bureaucracies: Services for Rape Victims.
Boles, Janet K.
Those studying the distribution of urban services have generally concluded that services are distributed according to bureaucratic decision rules based on professional and bureaucratic norms such as need, efficiency, economy, equity, and convenience. Interest groups and elected officials may play a central role in effecting changes in bureaucratic decision rules for service delivery, as well as in the adoption of new city services and nonincremental changes in existing services. Therefore, in seeking to advance the feminist agenda on the local level, women's rights groups have worked primarily through bureaucracies, not executives or legislatures. Local women's rights groups have presented their demands in a manner consistent with professional and bureaucratic norms, and also have worked through policy networks to transform local bureaucracies. This paper examines the process by which the women's agenda for the treatment of rape victims has led to significant change within bureaucracies organized around social welfare, criminal justice, and health care. The study focuses upon a set of urban services that have well-defined constituencies and clientele groups and moves beyond a concern with service delivery to examine redesign decisions via basic changes in the professional norms surrounding these services. It utilizes a model of the policy process based on interest group theory, the concept of a policy network, and explanations of bureaucratic change. Four tables and a 39-item bibliography of references are included. (Author/JB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Rutgers, The State Univ., New Brunswick, NJ. Eagleton Inst. of Politics.; American Political Science Association, Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: N/A