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ERIC Number: ED311869
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1984-Mar
Pages: 52
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Computers in Education: The Process of Change. Interactive Technology Laboratory Report #2.
Levin, Sandra Allan
This study traces the introduction of microcomputers in two elementary schools, one middle school, and one high school in San Diego County, California. To determine whether or not the process of introducing microcomputers in education includes the necessary elements for change outlined by S. Saranson--i.e., a positive concept of the change, involvement of those affected, and the development of constituencies--four teachers from each school were interviewed and observed in their classrooms to collect data on their training on microcomputers, their attitudes about microcomputers in the schools, their strategies for integrating computers into their classrooms, and conflicts engendered at all levels of the school system. In general, the study revealed a positive attitude on the part of teachers, principals, district administrators, and groups outside the schools toward the introduction of computers. Educators throughout the school system have been involved in this innovation. Teachers themselves have set goals and discussed implementation strategies with other teachers, principals, school district administrators, and business professionals. Constituencies have been developed as a means of survival in the coming years. Since all three of Sarason's conditions have been met in the schools in this study (resulting in a grassroots rather than a "top-down" change strategy, unlike the strategy observed in many other change processes), it is concluded that the introduction of computer technology is likely to be successful. (GL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: California Univ., San Diego, La Jolla. Center for Human Information Processing.