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ERIC Number: ED310717
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988-Jul
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Corporate Stake in Educating One Third of a Nation.
Cloud, Sanford Jr.
The importance of higher education for people of color who will soon make up one third of the U.S. population, is emphasized from the point of view of the Aetna Life & Casualty Foundation. Although the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s changed the course of history and people of color were offered access to higher education, something went wrong. The promise of the 1960s and 1970s diminished to the point where there is now declining participation and a tragic retention rate. Also, in the 1980s, the federal government backpedaled on affirmative action. Now not enough people of color are enrolling in college and even fewer are graduating. The gaps between minority groups and the majority population persist or are widening in education, employment, income, health, longevity, and other measures of well-being. If these disparities continue, the nation may suffer a lower standard of living, intensified social conflict, declining ability to compete in the world market, faltering economy, and endangered national security. American business and industry needs a pool of well educated and trained employees, many of whom will be minorities. A partnership between education and business is important but not enough. Government must also play a stronger role. Two of the steps Aetna has taken are (1) working with the public schools in Hartford, Connecticut to start an enrichment program for seventh graders and their parents; and (2) awarding a 3-year grant to a university to increase the enrollment of black students in graduate school. (SM)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Aetna Life and Casualty Foundation, Inc., Hartford, CT.
Note: Paper presented at the Minorities in Higher Education Conference (Washington, DC, July 1988).