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ERIC Number: ED310049
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1988
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Legislative Branch and the Constitutional Order. College-Community Forums.
Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution, Washington, DC.
The questions that observers of Congress have posed throughout U.S. history continue to confront citizens: how have the constitutional powers of Congress adapted to new conditions, and how has this affected Congress's relations with the other branches of government. Congress, in its constitutional design, is part of the remedy for the problems of republican forms of government that have plagued previous legislative bodies. Since 1789 constitutional debate has concerned the structure and powers of the branches themselves less than the exercise of particular powers. Some, both in and out of Congress, believe the "advice and consent" clause of Article II implies a prominent role for Congress in formulating and conducting the nation's foreign policy. Some constitutional reformers are concerned with the so-called congressional "gridlock." Reform proposals designed to overcome deadlocks between Congress and the president would restructure the government in a form resembling parliamentary democracy. It must be realized that debate on the Constitution is inevitable in a democracy, and that powers granted by the Constitution were designed to be adapted to changing circumstances. A list of 13 references is included. (PPB)
Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution, 808 Seventeenth Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20006 (no charge).
Publication Type: Historical Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Commission on the Bicentennial of the United States Constitution, Washington, DC.
Identifiers - Laws, Policies, & Programs: United States Constitution