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ERIC Number: ED309693
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Apr
Pages: 4
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Black Colleges: Something of Value.
Whiting, Albert N.
AAHE Bulletin, v41 n8 p8-10 Apr 1989
In the early stages of higher education desegregation, there was a disproportionate shifting of black students to historically white institutions. Today, it is estimated that about 82% of all black students in colleges and universities are enrolled in traditionally white institutions. As desegregation proceeded, the conviction grew that it was to flow in one direction: black into white. As state desegregation plans were developed under court directives, they were, at times, attended by calls for closing of black institutions or their merger into white higher education. Leaders and managers of black institutions have been slow to admit the existence of this trend; few, therefore, sought to compensate by broadening their institutional missions to appeal to a general community constituency. As a result, many black institutions lost enrollment and suffered financial distress. Many presidents were timid about broadening their missions for fear of criticism from the campus and local black community. More recently, however, statistics indicate a rather significant fact: black colleges and universities have been discovered by nonblacks as useful and effective channels of access to higher education. In all instances where there is high integration, state-supported institutions are involved. Because of public status and size, resources and curriculum breadth are significantly related dimensions and account for the appeal to these institutions across race lines. The idea held by some that some black educational institutions must be preserved for blacks only is inappropriate and self-limiting in today's environment. (SM)
American Association for Higher Education, One Dupont Circle, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20036 ($3.00).
Publication Type: Journal Articles; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A