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ERIC Number: ED308836
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1989-Feb
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Reducing the Density of Text Presentations Using Alternative Control Strategies and Media.
Ross, Steven M.; Morrison, Gary R.
A critical process in developing lessons for computer-based instruction (CBI) is to determine the manner in which information will be displayed on the screen, taking care not to ignore the computer's special display capabilities. The underlying assumption of this study was that reducing the density of text presentation would be effective for improving readability and learning under CBI. Subjects were 221 preservice teachers, who were randomly assigned to seven treatment groups according to a 2 (presentation mode: CBI or print) x 3 (density condition: high, low, or learner control) factorial design with one outside condition, "full" learner control of density and media selection. A preattitude survey, pretest, and reading test were administered during a regular class session. Major dependent variables consisted of four achievement measures (knowledge, calculation, and transfer subtests and a delayed posttest), total attitude score, and lesson completion time. Results supported earlier findings with print material by showing low-density text to be as effective as high-density text on every achievement measure. In contrast, fairly effective meta-cognition strategies appear to have been used by both low-achievers and high-achievers in selecting text density. Finally, no meaningful differences between presentation media were found on task outcomes. It may be that comparing media is less important than the selective and systematic matching of instructional strategies to the specific media that must powerfully represent them. (12 references) (CGD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Nelson Denny Reading Tests