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ERIC Number: ED307941
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988
Pages: 39
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Impact of Campus-Based Child Care on the Academic Success of Student-Parents at SUNY Community Colleges.
Fadale, LaVerna M.; Winter, Gene M.
The focus of this study was the relationship between campus-based child care services at the State University of New York (SUNY) community colleges and the academic success of student-parents. Academic success was defined as completion of a degree or certificate program, transfer, or continued enrollment. Data were collected through surveys mailed to the director of child care at each SUNY community college having operational child care services, and distributed to student-parents using the services. Responses were received from 24 SUNY community colleges and 501 student-parents. Study findings included the following: (1) 60.9% of the student-parents were between 21 and 30 years of age, 95.7% were female, and 67.5% were unemployed; (2) 81.6% of the student-parents credited child care availability as a very important factor in their decision to enroll, while 59.7% stated that they would not be able to continue without the service; (3) 88.9% identified supplemental benefits received from the child care services, including the opportunity to meet other student-parents and help with parental problems; (4) the success rate of student-parents was more than 26 percentage points greater than the general student population; (5) 87% of the respondents with incomes of less than $15,000 identified child care as important to their decision to pursue higher education; and (6) 98% gave positive responses regarding the quality of care and concern shown by the child care staff. The survey instruments are appended. (Author/JMC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Tests/Questionnaires
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: State Univ. of New York, Albany. Office for Community Colleges.
Authoring Institution: State Univ. of New York, Albany. Two Year Coll. Development Center.