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ERIC Number: ED306968
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1989-Mar
Pages: 41
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Organizational Alternatives to the Present Community College.
Dougherty, Kevin J.
Community college entrants lag behind four-year college entrants in their educational and economic attainment, and most significantly with respect to baccalaureate attainment. Generally, proposals that address the improvement of community colleges' baccalaureate preparation and transfer functions focus on either "nonstructural" or "structural" reforms. Nonstructural reforms include: (1) providing more personal and extensive tutoring, developing new kinds of remedial courses, and setting time limits for the completion of remedial coursework; (2) encouraging faculty-student interaction out of class, integrating students' jobs and academic life, and scheduling students in blocks of classes; (3) providing better transfer advising, exposing potential transfer students to four-year colleges, improving financial aid, and making it easier to transfer vocational credits; and (4) reducing post-transfer attrition by accepting more credits and improving the social integration of transfer students on campus. Structural reforms, on the other hand, recognize that obstacles to baccalaureate attainment exist in the organization, as well as the operations, of community colleges. Three main proposals have been made for changing the colleges' structure: ending the comprehensive nature of the community college and focusing strictly on its vocational-technical role; converting community colleges into two-year branch campuses of state universities; and converting community colleges into four-year colleges. The structural reforms will require further debate, but the comparatively uncontroversial nonstructural reforms can be implemented immediately to achieve significant and relatively immediate benefits. (ALB)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented to the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (San Francisco, CA, March 27-31, 1989).