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ERIC Number: ED304602
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988-Nov-21
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Coresidence with Adult Children: A Comparision of Divorced and Widowed Women.
Cooney, Teresa M.
This study examined basic differences in the prevalence of coresidence with adult children for middle-aged and older divorcees and widows. Data were obtained from the June 1985 Marital and Fertility History Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Subjects consisted of 11,484 married, 3,854 widowed, and 1,994 divorced women with adult children. The results revealed that for middle-aged women (those under age 60), there were only slight differences between marital status groups; approximately one-half of the women in each group coresided with an adult child. For older women (aged 60 and older), widows were more likely than married women to be residing with an adult child. Widows and divorcees did not differ substantially in the likelihood of coresidence with adult children; slightly more than 25% of the women in each group resided with an adult child. Further analyses revealed that age, recency of marital disruption, and type of marital disruption all played a role in the women's patterns of coresidence with adult children. Cases of coresidence involving daughters rather than sons were more likely among divorced than widowed women in both age groups. Divorced women were more likely than widows to share a residence in which they were not the household head. The results suggest that when the type of marital disruption occurs "off-time" (widowhood in middle age, divorce in old age), women are especially likely to depend on adult offspring for support through coresidence. (NB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD.
Authoring Institution: North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Carolina Population Center.
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Gerontological Society (41st, San Francisco, CA, November 18-22, 1988).