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ERIC Number: ED301623
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988-Aug-13
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Self-Identity Development Model of Oppressed People: Inclusive Model for All?
Highlen, Pamela S.; And Others
The Self-Identity Development Model of Oppressed People (SIDMOP) is a synthesis of several areas of psychology, including developmental, cross cultural, and spiritual literatures. SIDMOP provides an all-inclusive model of identity development for oppressed minorities in the United States, regardless of ethnicity. The model was formulated from the following sources: (1) the authors' personal narratives; (2) clinical and anecdotal accounts; and (3) research literature. In addition, a male or a female were interviewed from the following groups: (1) Black; (2) Hispanic; (3) Asian American; (4) American Indian; (5) Jewish American; (6) Physically Disabled; and (7) Gay/Lesbian/Bisexual. The SIDMOP process moves through the following: (1) absence of conscious awareness; (2) transition from absence of conscious awareness to individuation; (3) individuation; (4) transition from individuation to dissonance; (5) dissonance; (6) transition from dissonance to immersion; (7) immersion; (8) transition from immersion to internalization; (9) internalization; (10) transition from internalization to integration; (11) integration; (12) transition from integration to transformation; and (13) transformation. Graphically the process can be likened to a spiral that moves along an infinity sign, illustrating the repetitive, never-ending progress through ascending levels of awareness. A table illustrates the parallels between SIDMOP and other identity development models, as well as a graphic representation. A list of references is also included. (FMW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Symposium presented at the American Psychological Association Convention (Atlanta, GA, August 13, 1988).