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ERIC Number: ED300989
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987
Pages: 42
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
What's a Teacher To Do? Child Abuse Education for the Classroom.
Wolverton, Lorraine M.
The book is intended to help educators become leaders in encouraging interagency cooperation and other community efforts to prevent child abuse. The first chapter discusses the school's role. Subsections consider: actions after reporting, communication with child protective services, sharing concerns, communication with parents, and education for prevention. The second chapter notes the teacher's additional roles of observer, listener, home visitor, reporter, and advocate. The next chapter looks at classroom strategies for child abuse education including bibliotherapy (preparation, implementation, book sharing ideas, related art activities); and building self-concept through a variety of classroom activities. The fourth chapter focuses on the maltreated adolescent with sections on failure to report adolescent maltreatment cases, onset of maltreatment, activities with adolescents, and topics for discussion. The final chapter considers child disclosure with simple suggestions for teachers such as "be calm,""believe the child, and "stress that it is not the child's fault." An appendix provides descriptions of 14 children's books, references to 13 others, as well as 7 bibliographies for locating other books. Also described are 18 books focusing on prevention and five audiovisual materials for children. The second appendix includes descriptions or references for 17 books or audiovisual materials for educators. (DB)
Publication Type: Guides - Non-Classroom
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: State Univ. of New York, Ithaca. Coll. of Human Ecology at Cornell Univ.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY. Dept of Human Development and Family Studies.
Note: A product of ESCAPE Family Life Development Center.