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ERIC Number: ED298237
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1978
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Status Equalization Project.
Cohen, Elizabeth G.; Deslonde, James
The introduction of the Multiple Ability Curriculum (MAC) and Expectation Training (ET) into the curriculum of racially integrated elementary schools appears to improve the equal status interaction between students of differing academic and social status. The goals of the MAC and ET are the following: (1) prevent classroom dominance by students of high academic standing; (2) develop higher expectations for intellectual competence on the part of poor readers; and (3) change racial stereotypes concerning intellectual competence. A 2-year controlled study was conducted involving 20 fifth and sixth grade classrooms in three racially integrated schools. Twelve classrooms received the MAC. Of those 12 classrooms, 5 also received the ET. Eight control classrooms received neither. Program effectiveness was evaluated by observing pairs of students from each classroom who played a game designed to reveal equal status behavior. Conclusions include the following: (1) reading skill has become the basis for expectations of competence over a wide range of school tasks; (2) minority students who were not perceived as good readers, but were socially influential and were seen as competent by their peers, acted on an equal status basis regardless of curriculum; (3) minority students who were not perceived as good readers, and were not socially influential, were helped by exposure to both the MAC and ET; and (4) in a classroom where whites perceived many blacks as socially influential, the status of all black low readers was improved. Statistical data are included on two graphs. (FMW)
Publication Type: Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Administrators; Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Stanford Univ., CA. School of Education.
Note: For a related document, see ED 175 971.