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ERIC Number: ED295632
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988-Jan
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Feedback, Correctness of Response, and Response Confidence on Learner's Retention in Computer-Assisted Instruction.
Chanond, Kanitha
This study examined the effects of feedback, the correctness of response, and response confidence within the context of computer-assisted instruction (CAI). The subjects were 120 students enrolled in the four computer literacy classes at the University of Texas. The instructional material on the human eye involved 30 program frames with three alternative multiple choice questions relating to the content of the lesson; the type of instructional task was recall of verbal information. One group was provided with feedback response in addition to choosing a confidence level for their answers; the other group was given only a choice of confidence level. Both groups were given immediate and delayed posttests. When the means on the immediate posttests were compared, those who received feedback performed significantly better than those who had not. However, the delayed posttest results showed no significant difference between the feedback and no feedback groups. It was also found that when the learner's confidence in the response was taken into account, providing feedback on either a high confidence or a low confidence correct response did not increase the probability that the response would be made correctly on later tests, although feedback on either a high confidence or low confidence incorrect answer helped the learner to correct the error. The text is supplemented by one figure and three tables. (24 references) (EW)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: In: Proceedings of Selected Research Papers presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Educational Communications and Technology (New Orleans, LA, January 14-19, 1988). For the complete proceedings, see IR 013 331.