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ERIC Number: ED292992
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1988-Apr
Pages: 33
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Decision-making Profiles of a Group of High School Seniors Engaged in the Transition to Adulthood.
Loesch-Griffin, Deborah A.
A study constructed a detailed description of students' perceptions of the transition to adulthood and the decision-making strategies used as they approached high school graduation. A Post-High School Plans Survey was administered to 186 seniors in Northern California; a subsample of 32 students was interviewed to assess identity, exploitation, and commitment. Three types of goal orientations (task, self, social) were analyzed in relation to four decision outcome categories (four-year college, junior college, noncollege, undecided) and the decision-making processes involved. The post-high school decision-making process was related to students' perceptions of this time as initiating the transition to adulthood in two significant ways. First, if students perceived that upon leaving high school they were entering new roles and requirements as young adults, they were more likely to initiate the thinking and goal-setting necessary to establish a path into adulthood. Second, students who perceived themselves as involved in adult development were more likely to have stronger goals and higher levels of thinking during the transition to adulthood. The most promising decision-making profile was associated with students' perceptions of adulthood as being initiated during high school years but continuing on into the mid-20s. Students with a sense of the "big picture" of adulthood were better able to evaluate alternatives as they left high school and to select a career that reflected their commitment to a particular identity. (YLB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 5-9, 1988).