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ERIC Number: ED292042
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Aug
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Understanding Adolescent Contraceptive Choice: An Empirical Test.
Adler, Nancy E.; And Others
Research using expectancy models has shown contraceptive choice among adults to be a rational process in that intentions and behaviors reflect an individual's beliefs, values, attitudes, and perceptions of social norms. This study examined whether such an approach could accurately represent adolescents' contraceptive decision-making. It used the model of reasoned action developed by Fishbein and Ajzen (1980) to examine intention to use each of four methods of birth control (pill, condom, diaphragm, and withdrawal) in the next year. Adolescents (N=505) seeking health care from either a university adolescent medicine clinic or an adolescent clinic of a large health maintenance organization were interviewed regarding their beliefs, values, and intentions regarding contraceptive use. Analyses were performed separately for the four groups of sexually active/inactive males and females. The results support the utility of the model in the adolescent sample. For sexually active and inactive females, beliefs about the consequences of use of each method and evaluations of those consequences were significantly related to subjects' global attitude or overall attitude about using the contraceptive. For males, these relationships were significant for three of the four methods. The findings suggest that adolescents do engage in a rational process in making contraceptive choices and that these relate to their intentions as well as their behaviors. (NB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Child Health and Human Development (NIH), Bethesda, MD. Center for Population Research.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (95th, New York, NY, August 28-September 1, 1987).