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ERIC Number: ED291356
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Nov-13
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Boys, Girls, and a Scarcity of Microcomputers: "They Get on It Before We Can Get to It".
Reece, Carol C.
The main purposes of this survey were to: (1) assess the perceptions and attitudes of students about whether boys or girls spend more time working with computers; (2) explore whether individual students at school prefer working alone or with someone else; (3) explore the possibility that girls who have access to home computers also have older brothers at home; (4) inquire about parents' use or nonuse of computers at work or at home; and (5) continue to assess the extent to which parents are providing home computers for daughters as well as for sons. A total of 212 fourth through sixth grade students from both private and public schools were surveyed over a two-year period in a deliberate effort to branch from a previous study in which fifth grade, seventh grade, and high school students were surveyed on similar issues. Chi-square analysis of the data for the present study failed to find significant sex differences with respect to any of the questions although instances of sex-typing in relationship to computers were identifiable in the survey responses. Based on the findings of this study, it is concluded that mandated computer instruction should be initiated at the third or fourth grade level, if not earlier, in order to overcome gender barriers to equitable computer learning at school and assumed future career opportunities associated with higher technology. Results of the statistical analysis are displayed in two graphs and 11 references are listed. (CGD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association (16th, Mobile, AL, November 13, 1987).