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ERIC Number: ED286465
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effect of Typing Skill on Using a Word Processor for Composition.
Gerlach, Gail J.
This investigation of the effect of typing skill on using a word processor for composition hypothesized that students who had learned keyboarding skills would: (1) write longer essays when using a word processor; (2) revise their essays more when using a word processor; (3) feel more positive about typing when using a word processor than students who had not learned keyboarding skills; and (4) continue to improve these skills if they were monitored while keyboarding their compositions. The 19 fourth grade students from a semi-rural university laboratory school in western Pennsylvania who served as subjects were randomly assigned to one of two treatments, i.e., one group received instruction in keyboarding via a typing tutorial, while the other group did not receive such instruction. Both groups then received instruction in a word processing program for use in writing. Results revealed no significant differences between the two groups in the length of their compositions, the total number of revisions they made, the types of revisions made, or their attitudes about using the word processor for writing. The results did support the fourth hypothesis, however, as the typing tutorial group showed significant gains in typing speed and accuracy after using word processing under supervision for four months. Limitations of the study are noted and areas for future research are suggested. A list of 24 references is provided, and an outline of categories for coding revisions on compositions is appended. (Author/MES)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987).