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ERIC Number: ED286085
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr-24
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Induction of Counselors to the Profession.
Matthes, William A.
The induction of counselors to the profession is given as little attention in the literature as it is in schools. The importance of induction cannot be stressed enough for counselors, but education is one of the few professions in this society which expects new members to assume the responsibilities of experienced members. A study was conducted to examine the induction processes used for new school counselors and the problems encountered by these counselors. New school counselors (N=40) identified by the Iowa Department of Public Instruction completed the Conditions for Professional Practice: Counselor's Perceptions questionnaire, providing demographic information, information on school characteristics, and responses to six vignettes describing situations new counselors might encounter. The vignettes concerned the areas of client-counselor relationship, public presentation, psychological education, testing, parent-counselor relationship, and teacher-counselor relationship. Respondents most frequently reported concerns with clients, teachers, and parents, in that order, suggesting that concerns with interpersonal dynamics were encountered with great frequency. Counselors functioning in rural schools were the most likely to report receiving no help in resolving their concerns. Significant differences were found between rural and urban counselors in the areas of age and teaching experience, with urban counselors being older and having taught longer than rural counselors. The results suggest that new counselors are expected to function in isolation with minimal support and supervision. New counselors, especially in rural settings, reported receiving little support in resolution of concerns they encountered. (NB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987).