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ERIC Number: ED283196
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Comparison of Writing Instruction Using Word Processing, Word Processing with Voice Synthesis, and No Word Processing in Kindergarten and First Grade.
Kurth, Ruth J.; Kurth, Lila M.
A study was conducted in which word processing and voice synthesis were used to teach beginning writing skills to kindergarten and first grade students. Subjects, 46 children from two elementary schools enrolled in an early education summer school class in writing, were randomly divided into three groups. One group was taught writing using a beginning-level word processor and printer. The second group used a word processor capable of synthesized speech and a printer. The final group did not use word processing equipment but had access to a copying machine and were allowed to make transparencies of their stories for sharing. The children in the two word processing groups were given three sessions of keyboard training before they started writing (the voice synthesizer group was taught the "talk" command). Students were asked to write six stories in the two-week period and were encouraged to form collaborative and editing groups. Each child was assigned two "writing helpers" and had to have each story approved by them before turning it in. Results indicated that very young children can benefit from instruction using word processors and voice synthesizers and that using these devices seemed to foster collaborative writing. The use of word processing cannot substitute for quality writing instruction, but a combination of the two can facilitate group discussion and peer editing. (Twenty-seven references are included.) (AEW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987).