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ERIC Number: ED282844
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Cognition and Metacognition in Teachers' Professional Development.
Calderhead, James
This research explored how student teachers learn to teach and how they orient themselves to the processes of professional learning. A group of ten primary-grade student teachers were followed through a one-year post-graduate teacher training course, focusing primarily on the one-term field experience that occurred in the middle of the year. The students were regularly observed and interviewed about their teaching and what they were extracting from the experience. Their college tutors, supervising teachers, and principals were interviewed concerning their role in facilitating professional learning. Though experiences varied, the student teachers commonly passed through three phases, each characterized by a different conception of the student teaching task. The first involved anxiety while "fitting in" to the supervising teacher's routines. The second focused on "passing the test" and satisfying college tutors of their basic competence. The third phase was characterized by students, teachers, and tutors regarding the field experience as an "opportunity to experiment" and discover one's own style of teaching. In all three phases, however, a number of constraints acted to limit students' learning from the experience. As a result, student teachers' professional learning quickly reached a plateau, and their analysis and development of practice remained at a superficial level. The paper concludes with some discussion on the implications of the research for the design of preservice teacher education courses. (Author/JD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987).