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ERIC Number: ED279482
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1986
Pages: 69
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Retention of the Latino University Student: The Case of CSULB.
Ramirez, Genevieve M.
This study examines the characteristics, needs, and actual experiences of Latino (Mexican American/Chicano and other Hispanic) students enrolled at California State University, Long Beach (CSULB), through identification of Hispanic demographic characteristics from university records, comparison of Student Affirmative Action Outreach Program (SAA) participants with non-participant Latino peers, and random sample interviews with SAA participants. Although Latino CSULB enrollment grew from 5.4% to 8.7% from 1975 to 1985, Latinos, who comprise 18.1% of California high school graduates, are greatly underrepresented. Of SAA Latino students entering CSULB in 1982-83, 73% had been retained to begin their fourth year in 1985 or had graduated. Findings indicate academic failure/difficulty results from unrealistic expectations, lack of clear personal goals deemed attainable, general alienation from the institutional mainstream, and interference of external circumstances. Factors favoring academic persistence/performance include parental influence, early expectations for higher education, appropriate course scheduling incorporating skills development classes with academic solids, and clear career/major direction. Recommendations offered to enhance Latino student retention include providing academic support programs for new students; staffing programs with professionals; and offering programs with advisor controlled scheduling, supplementary/tutorial instruction, career exploration/planning, financial aid/evaluation, incentives for campus organizational/activity involvement, help in identifying career-related internships, and intensive intervention for unsatisfactory progress. (NEC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Administrators; Researchers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A