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ERIC Number: ED279409
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1986-Apr
Pages: 9
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Three-Month-Old Infants' Differential Vocal Responsiveness to Mother vs. Stranger as a Function of Maternal Education.
Roe, Kiki V.; Bronstein, Robin
A study explored whether socioeconomic status (SES) differences could be detected in 3-month-old infants' differential vocal responsiveness (DVR) to mothers versus strangers. The study also explored whether 3-month-olds' DVR was related to environmental variables, such as the mother's behaviors toward the infant in naturalistic conditions, the mother's statement as to whether the baby was planned or not, and the infants' exposure to excessive auditory stimulation, such as loud noise and/or television. A final objective was to explore whether SES differences existed in the environmental variables. Subjects were 34 normal, full-term, first-born American infants who were divided into two groups on the basis of their mothers' educational levels. Results showed that infants of mothers with higher education had significantly higher DVR scores than infants of mothers with lower education. Infants' DVR was associated with maternal vocal stimulation and exposure to television. A significantly higher percentage of high education than low education mothers said their baby was planned. Planned babies were exposed to television significantly less than unplanned babies. Significant SES differences in infants' exposure to television were found. Results also indicated that SES differences in cognitive processing, as measured by a vocal and language-relevant infant behavior, can be detected very early in life. Implications of the findings are briefly discussed. (RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the International Conference on Infant Studies (5th, Los Angeles, CA, April 10-13, 1986).