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ERIC Number: ED276866
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1986-Dec
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Extent to Which Electronic Technology Education Is Meeting Employment Needs of Industry.
Wamble, Jack D.
A study compared the perceptions of electronic technology education teachers and employers in the electronics industry regarding the competencies graduates need for employment in the industry. The study population consisted of 27 state institutions with electronics technology programs in Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Illinois, Kentucky, and Tennessee and 60 employers that were listed as anticipating a need to hire electronics technologists and having hired graduates from one of the study schools within the past 5 years. Twenty-one institutions (78 percent) and 45 employers (75 percent) returned survey instruments containing usable information. The educators placed more emphasis on topics that lend themselves to classroom instruction and tended to place less emphasis on the operations involved in complex circuit operation than did the employers. Specifically, the teachers emphasized such terms as calculate, describe, solve, and verify, whereas employers placed most emphasis on such terms as construct, connect, and set up and test. Teachers and employers were in close agreement concerning competencies dealing with principles of direct and alternating current. Employers tended to ascribe greater importance to skills in the area of microcomputers, industrial power, and the principles of industrial electronics than did the teachers. No significant differences were found between the employer and teacher attitudes toward competencies covered in courses in advanced electronic circuits, electronic drafting, radio communication, and electronic projects. (Included in this report is an eight-page table detailing teacher and employer rankings of the 104 compentencies assessed.) (MN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Vocational Association (Dallas, TX, December 1986).