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ERIC Number: ED274924
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1986-Aug
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Dimensionality of Supervisor Roles: Counselor Trainees' Perceptions of Supervision.
Ellis, Michael V.; And Others
A study was conducted which continued the investigation of the underlying structure of supervision by empirically testing Bernard's (1979) model of supervision using a confirmatory multidimensional scaling paradigm. To accomplish this, counselor trainees' perceptions of the underlying structure (dimensionality or cognitive map) of supervision were compared to the three-dimensional cognitive map Ellis and Dell (in press) found for supervisors. Subjects (n=15) were doctoral students in a counseling psychology program. Nine stimuli resulting from combining three supervisor roles with the three supervisor functions were derived from Bernard's model of supervision. Subjects made paired comparison ratings for perceived dissimilarity of the nine supervisor-role stimuli on a nine-point scale ranging from very similar to very dissimilar. Stimuli were rated on bipolar attribute scales. A remarkably good fit was found between the trainees' perceptions and the cognitive map used by supervisors. The first dimension used by trainees could be construed as a process-personalization-conceptualization continuum identical to Ellis and Dell's model and consistent with Bernard's second dimension of supervisor function. The second dimension apeared to be bipolar, resembling somewhat the single dimension postulated by Lettrell et al. (1979). The third dimension appeared bipolar also, contrasting emotional, supportive supervision of competent trainees with cognitive-behavioral, evaluative supervision of neophyte trainees. References, tables, and figures are provided. (ABL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (94th, Washington, DC, August 22-26, 1986). For related document, see CG 019 429.