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ERIC Number: ED274319
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1986-Jun
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Instructional Uses of School Computers. Reports from the 1985 National Survey. Issue No. 1.
Becker, Henry Jay
Instructional Uses of School Computers, n1 Jun 1986
The Second National Survey of Instructional Uses of School Computers gathered information from more than 10,000 principals and computer-using teachers in a probability sample of over 2,300 U.S. elementary and secondary schools during the spring of 1985. Information was obtained through questionnaires and telephone interviews. The first of six to be issued from this survey, this report concentrates on basic numbers. In a typical school, during the 1984-85 school year, nearly half of the elementary and middle school pupils and as many as one-third of the high school students made some use of computers at school. One-fourth of all U.S. teachers used computers "regularly" with students during the year, and the amount of experience that any one computer-using student had with school computers doubled between 1983 and 1985. Mathematics, language arts, computer literacy, programming, and business education were the major subjects for which computers were used. Computers used for school instruction can be found in classrooms, laboratories, libraries, offices, and hallways; they can be fixed or on mobile carts to rotate among several rooms. Students are getting more time to use computers because there are more computers at individual schools and each computer is used more. Computer laboratories are used for more hours of the week than are classroom or library computers, especially in elementary and middle schools, and the typical student working in a computer laboratory uses computers for about twice as much time as the typical computer user in a classroom. Data are displayed in seven tables and nine figures. (DJR)
Publication Type: Collected Works - Serials; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD. Center for Social Organization of Schools.
Note: For a preliminary report on this survey, see IR 012 279. For a document related to the first survey, see ED 244 618.