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ERIC Number: ED272840
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Visual and Auditory Modalities and Reading Recall: A Review of the Research.
Robinson, Karlen
Of particular interest to those exploring students' learning modalities is the relationship between the visual and auditory systems and reading recall. Among the findings of studies that have investigated this relationship are the following: (1) reading competency is dependent as much on auditory processing as on visual processing; (2) when visual and auditory signals are presented simultaneously, subjects generally respond to the visual input and are often unaware that an auditory signal has occurred; (3) auditory stimuli are processed more rapidly than visual stimuli; (4) when preschool children's evaluation and integration of visual and auditory information was compared with that of adults both groups were found to have available continuous and independent sources of information; (5) memory training increases a child's ability to retain stimuli; (6) under audio/video mismatch conditions, memory for audio information is reduced more than memory for video information; however, comprehension and recognition of audio information is similar in the audio only and audio/video match conditions; (7) children recall logical sequences better than illogical ones; and (8) children of all ages show a correspondence between strategy use and metamemory as assessed by verbalization of relationships among pictures during specific questioning; however, when a more typical general question format is used to assess metamemory, strategy use precedes verbalized knowledge of strategy use. In general, most studies show that visual stimuli tend to dominate other modalities in both perceptual and memory tasks. A three-page list of references concludes the document. (HOD)
Publication Type: Information Analyses
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A