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ERIC Number: ED271205
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1986-Apr
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Children's Conceptions of Trust.
Kahn, Peter H., Jr.; Turiel, Elliot
Aware that children conceive of different types of trust, a study examined 60 children's conception of trust. The subjects comprised three age groups: 6-7 years old, 8-9 years old, and 10-11 years old. Each subject was interviewed on the basis of three stories. The stories depicted a hypothesized violation of trust in a moral context (lying), social-conventional context (dress code), and psychological context (helping a friend in time of psychological need). Each story presented a hypothetical situation in which the subject played a central role. Each story-trust interview included questions pertaining to the children's (1) evaluations and justifications of the rightness or wrongness of trust violations, (2) how trust can be reestablished after it is broken, (3) how trust helps maintain children's friendships, and (4) whether trust violations result in the victim having negative feelings toward the trust violator. Within each context it was examined whether, and if so how, each trust violation would lessen feelings of friendship. Results showed that moral and psychological trust, and not social-conventional trust, were qualities that comprised criteria by which the children maintained both intimate and casual friendships. In addition, moral trust, once violated, was more difficult to re-establish than social-conventional and psychological trust. A list of references, nine tables of data, samples of stories used in the interviews, descriptions of responses, and examples of each justification category are appended. (HOD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (70th, San Francisco, CA, April 16-20, 1986).