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ERIC Number: ED270917
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Aug
Pages: 167
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Maternal Attributions of Communication in Dyads with Handicapped and Nonhandicapped 11-Month-Olds. Final Report.
Yoder, Paul J.
The frequency and nature of maternal attributions of communication in dyads with 16 11-month old handicapped infants were examined. For some aspects of the study the experimental group was compared with a control group of 16 dyads in which the same-age infants were not handicapped. The study addressed four major purposes: (1) to compare groups on the frequency of maternal attributions of communication; (2) to compare explanatory models for within-group variance on frequency of maternal attributions; (3) to test the relation of infant and maternal factors on the types of behavior that mothers of handicapped children called communicative; and (4) to describe the maternal elicitations and responses to those behaviors. Structured assessment procedures and behavioral coding of free play sessions were used in two studies. Among results were indication of group differences in the total occurrence of three of four potentially communicative infant behaviors; no group difference in the frequency of maternal attributions of communication; a positive within-handicapped sample relation between degree of handicap and maternal tendency to attribute; and a positive within-handicapped sample relation between degree of handicap and maternal responsiveness to communicative behaviors. Results challenge the assumption that mothers of handicapped children respond less frequently to their infants than do other mothers. (CL)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Doctoral Dissertations; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Special Education Programs (ED/OSERS), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Frank Porter Graham Center.
Note: Ph.D. Dissertation, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.