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ERIC Number: ED268996
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Apr
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Survey of Incentives for Staff Development of Computer-Based Instruction.
Winkler, John D.; Stasz, Cathleen
Research was conducted to assess the role of staff development in improving the quality of computer-based instruction in grade K-12 schools. The sample consisted of contact persons in 171 districts and interviews were completed with 155 (91%). Results indicate 80% of these districts currently provide inservice computer training to teachers; the median amount available is 25 hours. Most also provide technical assistance to teachers with hardware problems (95%), locating and evaluating courseware (80%), and integrating the microcomputer into the curriculum (65%). The median number of microcomputers found in these districts is 35, or a ratio of two microcomputers per five teachers and three microcomputers per 100 students. Incentives for participation in computer inservice training are not common: the most common are commendations or publicity (47%), release time for classes (41%), salary credit (36%), and guaranteed access to microcomputers (35%). The most important incentive was among those least commonly found in this sample--a guarantee of computer access. It was found that traditional incentives dispensed by administrators to teachers have little effect in fostering teacher involvement with computers and distinctions between "extrinsic" incentives such as salary credit and "intrinsic" incentives such as professional recognition did not prove to be conceptually or empirically important. A bibliography is appended. (JB)
Rand Corporation, 1700 Main Street, P. O. Box 2138, Santa Monica, CA 90406-2138 ($4.00).
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Administrators; Policymakers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Rand Corp., Santa Monica, CA.
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (69th, Chicago, IL, March 31-April 4, 1985). For related reports, see IR 012 084, ED 264 839, and ED 265 838.