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ERIC Number: ED267320
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Aug-25
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Clinical Treatment of Nonrecent Rape: How Much Do We Know?
Koss, Mary P.; And Others
Although studies indicate that as many as 22 percent of women have been raped, few of these women seek help immediately after the rape. Most rape victims experience a postrape distress response which may not be resolved for some victims. Long-term symptom patterns include fear/avoidance responses, affective constriction, disturbances of self-esteem/self-efficacy, and sexual dysfunction. The understanding of long-range psychological problems is complicated by temporal distance between trauma and aftereffects, the interaction of trauma with the victim's coping process, and life changes. Because of culturally supported myths about rape such as the woman bearing responsibility for the rape, a victim is more likely to accommodate the rape than to resolve it. Most treatment studies have focused on only the first year postrape. A stress inoculation treatment package for nonrecent rape victims who are demonstrating phobic fears has been developed which includes didactic, coping skills, cognitive, and facing fears components. Procedures for treatment of nonrecent rape victims include assessing spontaneous rape resolution; building a relationship with the client; addressing resistance; and fostering rape resolution through discussion of painful feelings, involvement of the social network, promotion of cognitive re-appraisal, restoration of self-efficacy, and treatment of target symptoms. Refinement in conceptual models of rape impact and resolution is needed. (ABL)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: National Inst. of Mental Health (DHHS), Rockville, MD. National Center for the Control and Prevention of Rape.
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (93rd, Los Angeles, CA, August 23-27, 1985).