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ERIC Number: ED266345
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1985-Aug-24
Pages: 17
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Macrostructural Implications of the Holland Theory.
Whyte, James A.; Rayman, Jack R.
The interaction between personality and social structure is one of the grand themes of both classical and contemporary social science. While different disciplines have addressed this issue from a variety of perspectives, within both sociology and psychology there are long standing research traditions that focus on the relationship between personality and the occupational role structure. In psychology, the Holland theory of vocational choice has received a considerable amount of research interest and support over the last decade. Widely used as a theoretical perspective in research and as an orienting and classification device in vocational counseling, the perspective of the Holland theory is that a person searches for an occupation that will be congruent with his or her personality. Macrostructural implications show that the probability of congruence is determined by the degree of isomorphism between the relative frequency distributions of personality and occupation types. The relative frequency distribution of occupation types is determined by technology and socioeconomic factors. Some personality types will experience increased structural incongruences when the system's isomorphism decreases and they will be less likely to replicate their personality type through redistribution mechanisms. Redistribution will, however, act to decrease the membership of personality types that are affected by structural incongruence and consequently the system will tend towards a condition of isomorphism. This theory has both cultural and research implications. (Author/ABB)
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers - Assessments and Surveys: Holland Vocational Preference Inventory