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ERIC Number: ED265901
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 23
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Attitudes and Student Perceptions: Their Measure and Relationship to Performance in Elementary Algebra, Intermediate Algebra, College Algebra and Technical Mathematics.
Eldersveld, Paul; Baughman, David
A study was conducted at a large suburban community college in Northern Illinois to examine the nature of the relationship between student self-perception/attitude variables and final course grades in four levels of mathematics: elementary algebra, intermediate algebra, college algebra, and technical mathematics. Findings, based on data obtained from 89 elementary algebra students, 70 intermediate algebra students, 83 college algebra students, and 67 technical mathematics students, included the following: (1) 65% of the students had previously taken a similar course; (2) 55% indicated a neutral or negative attitude toward math, with college algebra and technical math students exhibiting more positive attitudes; (3) more than 70% of the students rated their math ability as average or poor, with college algebra and technical math students rating themselves higher; (4) 65% stated that they were taking the course because it was a prerequisite or required for a major; (5) about 50% reported taking their last math courses 2 or more years previously; (6) 65% of the students felt they would perform at an above average level or higher in the course, and the final course grade average was slightly above C; and (7) the higher the course level, the more positively the students rated their confidence, the lower their anxiety level, and the more positively the students perceived the teacher's attitude to be. The study report includes a stepwise regression analysis of data. (EJV)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (68th, New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 1984).