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ERIC Number: ED264082
Record Type: Non-Journal
Publication Date: 1985-Sep-18
Pages: 330
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Indian Juvenile Alcoholism and Eligibility for BIA Schools. Hearing before the Select Committee on Indian Affairs. United States Senate, Ninety-Ninth Congress, First Session on S. 1298 and S. 1621.
Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.
The Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs met to receive testimony on a bill (S. 1298) to coordinate and expand services for the prevention, identification, and treatment of alcohol and drug abuse among Indian juveniles and a related bill (S. 1621) concerned with eligibility for attending Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) schools. Most testimony concerned S. 1298, which addresses the problem of alcohol and drug abuse among Indian youth by requiring: more coordination of information and services between the BIA and the Indian Health Service (IHS); training of all personnel working directly with Indian youth; a more comprehensive education program in BIA schools; alternative placements for children arrested for drug and alcohol related offenses; and more comprehensive alcohol and drug abuse treatment centers that include detoxification facilities, counseling services, and follow-up care. This report includes the texts of the bills, transcription of the hearing proceedings, and numerous prepared statements from government agencies and tribal organizations. Statements from the BIA and IHS support the goals of S. 1298 but do not support the bill as a means to achieve those goals. Statements by tribal representatives are largely supportive of the bill, but include suggestions for insuring enforcement funding, local authority, etc. (JHZ)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Indian Affairs.